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Research Article  |  Open Access  |  5 Jun 2024

Sustainable synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite for efficient capture of CO2

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Chem Synth 2024;4:31.
10.20517/cs.2023.70 |  © The Author(s) 2024.
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Abstract

Selective adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) is significant for carbon neutrality, where searching for efficient CO2 adsorbents is very important. In addition, coal fly ash (CFA) is one of the largest industrial solid wastes with environmental damages, where conversion of the wastes into costly functional materials is attractive. This work showed sustainable synthesis of Fe-containing mordenite (Fe-MOR) zeolite from the CFA waste under solvent-free conditions, and this zeolite is an efficient capturer for CO2 in the mixture of CO2/N2 (15/85, v/v), giving adsorption capacity of 2.07 mmol/g and separation coefficient of 58.9 at 298 K. Very interestingly, the capture of CO2 in the mixture of CO2/N2 (15/85, v/v) is recyclable. This work not only solved the accumulation and pollution of CFA but also prepared a highly efficient adsorbent of Fe-MOR zeolite, which would open a door for utilizing environmentally unfriendly solid wastes as value-added functional materials in the future.

Keywords

Sustainable synthesis, Fe-MOR zeolite, CO2 capture, coal fly ash (CFA)

INTRODUCTION

The rapid increase of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO2), is one of the global problems that could increase the likelihood and severity of natural disasters such as wildfires, heatwaves, and droughts[1-8]. Since renewable energy resources are still being developed and thus fossil fuels will remain the dominant energy source for a long time, it is crucial to efficiently curb CO2 emissions[9-17]. At present, great efforts have been made in developing efficient technologies for capturing CO2[18-22]. Among them, it is generally believed that solid porous adsorbents with low cost, high capacity and selectivity of CO2 are critical.

Zeolites, as a class of typically solid porous adsorbents with ordered micropores, are widely employed in fields such as catalysis, ion exchange, adsorption, and separation due to their high surface areas, large micropore volumes, and good stabilities[23-26]. In recent years, capturing CO2 by zeolites has become a hot topic due to their excellent stability for zeolite frameworks[3,4,18,27-32]. For example, Zhou et al. first reported that Fe-containing mordenite (Fe-MOR) zeolite synthesized from the “acid co-hydrolysis route” had narrowed microchannels, which was efficient for CO2 adsorption and separation[33]. However, this method, which uses tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as a starting raw material and generates wastewater in the hydrothermal synthesis, incurs relatively high costs. In addition, conventional synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite failed to obtain these narrowed microchannels under hydrothermal conditions due to the formation of aggregated Fe species. Thus, it is highly desirable to develop a simple and sustainable route for synthesizing Fe-MOR zeolite with high capacity and selectivity of CO2.

Recently, we developed a simple and sustainable route for solvent-free synthesis of zeolites, which completely avoided using water solvents[34-38], where the aggregation of Fe species was effectively hindered[39]. Therefore, it offers the possibility of preparing Fe-containing zeolites without aggregation of Fe species under solvent-free conditions. Considering that coal fly ash (CFA), mainly containing silica, alumina, and iron oxides, one of the largest industrial solid wastes emitted from the combustion of coal powder, is environmentally unfriendly[40-45], it is really sustainable for the conversion of the CFA waste into highly efficient adsorbent of Fe-MOR zeolite under solvent-free conditions.

This work, for the first time, showed a simple and sustainable synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite from CFA waste under solvent-free conditions. As expected, the Fe-MOR zeolite exhibited good adsorption capacity for CO2 (2.07 mmol/g at 298 K), high separation coefficient (58.9 at 298 K), and excellent recyclability. These features, plus sustainable synthesis, are helpful for potential applications of this zeolite in the future.

EXPERIMENTAL

Solvent-free synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite from CFA

Experimental sections, including materials and characterizations [Supplementary Materials].

For the solvent-free synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite from CFA (Fe-MOR-CFA), the CFA and NaOH powder were mixed at a mass ratio of 1:1.2, calcined at 800 °C for 2 h, cooled to room temperature, and ground into a fine powder at room temperature[37]. The chemical composition of the CFA and the activated CFA by alkali fusion were measured with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) [Supplementary Table 1].

As a typical run for the solvent-free synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite, 0.534 g of CFA fine powder, 0.879 g of solid silica, and 0.1 g of MOR zeolite as seeds were ground for 10 min. Subsequently, the obtained power was poured into an autoclave, and 1.2 g of H2O was added. The product was finally crystallized at 175 °C for 10 h and designated as Fe-MOR-CFA. The yield of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite is approximately 90%. The Si/Al ratio and Fe content of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite were 6.9 and 0.77 wt.% by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) measurements, which was consistent with the result of XRF [Supplementary Table 1].

For comparison, Fe-MOR zeolite was synthesized from an “acidic co-hydrolysis route” accordingly[33], which was designated as Fe-MOR-ACH. The Si/Al ratio and Fe content of the Fe-MOR-ACH zeolite were 6.5 and 0.73 wt.% by ICP-OES measurements.

Gas adsorption

Adsorption data for CO2 and N2 at 273 and 298 K were carried out in the Physical Adsorption Analyzer [Beishide Instrument Technology (Beijing) Co., Ltd., China]. Adsorption selectivity was based on ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST)[33] for CO2/N2 (15/85, v/v), determined by:

$$ S=\frac{x_{i}/x_{j}}{y_{i}/y_{j}} $$

Where x and y were the mole fraction of absorbate in the adsorption and gas phases, respectively. The subscripts i and j were on behalf of CO2 and N2.

Isosteric heat of adsorption[46] was calculated from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to predict the interactions between the adsorbate and the adsorbent, using the CO2 adsorption-desorption at 273 and 298 K, expressed as

$$ In\ P=-\frac{\Delta H_{s}}{R\times T}+C $$

Where P was the pressure, R was the ideal gas constant, 8.314 kJ/mol, C was the constant, T was the temperature, K, and ∆Hs was calculated from slopes of plots of In Pvs. 1/T of fixed loading.

The recyclability of single-component CO2 adsorption was obtained on the Weight Method Vacuum Steam Absorption [Beishide Instrument Technology (Beijing) Co., Ltd., China].

CO2 dynamic adsorption profiles for sole composition at 298 K were measured on the Gravity Vacuum Vapor Sorption Test Report [Beishide Instrument Technology (Beijing) Co., Ltd., China]. Firstly, 0.06~0.10 g of as-synthesized sample fine powder was loaded to the quartz tubing and activated under high vacuum at 573 K for 3 h. The pressure was increased to each set value (10, 20, 30, 40 kPa, etc.) at a rate of 10 kPa when the temperature cooled to 298 K. Each specific pressure was then maintained for a maximum of 3 h until adsorption equilibrium was reached.

The CO2/N2 breakthrough separations were performed in a multi-component adsorption breakthrough curve analyzer [Beishide Instrument Technology (Beijing) Co., Ltd., China] at 298 K. Firstly, 0.4~1.0 g of as-synthesized powder was placed in the quartz tubing (6 mm diameter) and then purged with He flow (5 mL/min) for 2 h at 573 K. The mixture (CO2/N2: 15/85, v/v) flows without water condition, with water condition and the presence of SO2 (1,000 ppm) were then introduced at 3.0 mL/min at 298 K. The flow rates of all gas mixtures were regulated by mass flow controllers; the humidity was controlled and detected using a multi-component adsorption breakthrough curve analyzer, and the CO2 and N2 concentrations from the adsorbent bed were continuously monitored with a gas analytical mass spectrometer. Besides, the zeolite was regenerated in situ in the column with a 5 mL/min flow at 573 K for 2 h.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Figure 1 displayed the schematic representation of solvent-free synthesis of Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite. Figure 2 showed the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image, N2 sorption isotherms, and 27Al magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite. The XRD pattern of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite [Figure 2A] displayed peaks with good resolution in the range of 5°-40°, which are well consistent with those of the simulated MOR structure [Supplementary Figure 1] and Fe-MOR-ACH zeolite [Supplementary Figure 2]. The SEM image of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite [Figure 2B] showed rod-shaped morphology, which is very similar to that of Fe-MOR-ACH zeolite [Supplementary Figure 3]. The N2 sorption isotherms of the H-Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite [Figure 2C] presented that the curve rose sharply at a relative pressure (10-6 < P/P0 < 0.01) owing to the filling of as-synthesized zeolite micropores by N2. Correspondingly, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and micropore volume were 434 m2/g and 0.18 cm3/g, respectively, which are extremely similar to the conventional MOR zeolite synthesized from the conventional raw materials (BET surface area of 420 m2/g, and micropore volume of 0.17 cm3/g) and the Fe-MOR-ACH zeolite (BET surface area of 443 m2/g and micropore volume of 0.18 cm3/g) [Supplementary Figure 4][47]. Figure 2D displayed the 27Al MAS NMR spectrum of the obtained Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite, giving a single peak with the chemical shift at about 60.4 ppm, which is commonly assigned to 4-coordinated Al species in the zeolite framework. After calcination at 823 K for 6 h, XRD patterns of Fe-MOR-CFA and Fe-MOR-ACH zeolites [Supplementary Figure 5] remained well, suggesting their good stabilities for the zeolite frameworks.

Sustainable synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite for efficient capture of CO<sub>2</sub>

Figure 1. Schematic representation of solvent-free synthesis of Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite from coal fly ash. Fe-MOR-CFA: Fe-containing mordenite zeolite from coal fly ash.

Sustainable synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite for efficient capture of CO<sub>2</sub>

Figure 2. (A) XRD pattern; (B) SEM image; (C) N2 sorption isotherms; and (D) 27Al MAS NMR spectrum of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite. XRD: X-ray diffraction; SEM: scanning electron microscopy; MAS: 27Al magic-angle spinning; NMR: nuclear magnetic resonance; Fe-MOR-CFA: Fe-containing mordenite zeolite from coal fly ash.

Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and electron spin resonance (ESR) techniques were used to investigate the chemical state of Fe species. UV-vis spectra of the Fe-MOR-CFA and Fe-MOR-ACH zeolites displayed two monomer bands centered at 210-220 nm and 250-265 nm, respectively [Figure 3A]. The 210-220 nm band was assigned to tetrahedrally coordinated Fe3+ ions, while the 250-265 nm band was attributed to isolated Fe3+ ions with higher coordination[47,48]. Notably, no peaks between 300 and 400 nm in the Fe-MOR-CFA and Fe-MOR-ACH zeolites were associated with oligonuclear FexOy clusters[49]. Their ESR spectra [Figure 3B] exhibited the signal at g = 4.3 associated with isolated Fe3+ ions with tetrahedral coordination and the signal at g = 2.0 related to Fe species inside microporous channels[33,50]. The above results revealed that the aggregated Fe species were excluded in these zeolites, confirming the feasibility of solvent-free synthesis of Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite from CFA.

Sustainable synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite for efficient capture of CO<sub>2</sub>

Figure 3. (A) UV-vis and (B) ESR spectra of Fe-MOR-CFA and Fe-MOR-ACH zeolites. UV-vis: Ultraviolet-visible; ESR: electron spin resonance; Fe-MOR-CFA: Fe-containing mordenite zeolite from coal fly ash; Fe-MOR-ACH: Fe-containing mordenite from acidic co-hydrolysis route.

Supplementary Figures 6 and 7 exhibited the XRD patterns and SEM images of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite samples with different ratios of the MOR zeolite seeds to SiO2 in the mixture of initial raw materials from 0 to 0.20. Notably, when no MOR zeolite seeds were added (a ratio of 0), the crystal size of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite was very large (with a diameter larger than 3 μm). However, when the zeolite seeds were included, the crystal sizes significantly decreased (with a diameter of less than 0.5 μm). These results suggested that a suitable ratio of the MOR zeolite seeds to SiO2 is significant for adjusting zeolite crystal sizes.

Supplementary Figure 8 showed the effect of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite on the Na2O/SiO2 ratios in the mixture of initial raw materials. Pure Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite could be obtained when the ratios of Na2O/SiO2 were adjusted from 0.22 to 0.26 [Supplementary Figure 8A and B]. When the ratios were higher than 0.29, the ANA phase was observed in the zeolite product [Supplementary Figure 8C]. Therefore, the Na2O/SiO2 ratios should be seriously regulated in the solvent-free synthesis of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite.

Figure 4 showed the crystallization process of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite explored by XRD and SEM techniques. Firstly, very weak peaks of MOR zeolite before crystallization were observed, which was related to the MOR zeolite seeds in the mixture of initial raw materials [Figure 4A(a)]. A series of peaks associated with MOR structure appeared when the crystallization time was 4 h [Figure 4A(b)]. Meanwhile, a few Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite crystals could be observed obviously from the SEM image [Figure 4B(b)], which was extremely consistent with the XRD pattern. The zeolite crystals formed quickly from 4 to 6 h, as observed from both XRD patterns and SEM images [Figure 4A(c) and B(c)]. The XRD intensity of the obtained samples did not change after the crystallization for 10 h, meaning a full crystallization [Figure 4A(e)]. Accordingly, more Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite crystals could be attained [Figure 4B(e)]. The dependence of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite crystallinity on crystallization time was shown in Supplementary Figure 9.

Sustainable synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite for efficient capture of CO<sub>2</sub>

Figure 4. (A) XRD patterns and (B) SEM images of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite crystallized at (a) 0, (b) 4, (c) 6, (d) 8, (e) 10, and (f) 12 h, respectively. XRD: X-ray diffraction; SEM: scanning electron microscopy; Fe-MOR-CFA: Fe-containing mordenite zeolite from coal fly ash.

Quantitative porosity was analyzed using N2 and Ar sorption experiments. Both the Fe-MOR-CFA and Fe-MOR-ACH zeolites exhibited extremely low N2 and Ar uptake [Figure 5, Supplementary Figures 10 and 11, Supplementary Table 2], suggesting that both with narrowed orifices retard larger N2 (3.64 Å) and even Ar (3.4 Å)[33]. In contrast, both samples enable CO2 to enter with a small kinetic diameter (3.3 Å), as supported by CO2 sorption isotherms of the samples [Figure 5]. The CO2 adsorption capacities of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite at 273 and 298 K were 3.31 mmol/g and 2.93 mmol/g, respectively, which is comparable with those (3.45 and 3.09 mmol/g) of the Fe-MOR-ACH zeolite.

Sustainable synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite for efficient capture of CO<sub>2</sub>

Figure 5. CO2 and N2 sorption isotherms of (A) Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite and (B) Fe-MOR-ACH zeolite at 273 and 298 K. Fe-MOR-CFA: Fe-containing mordenite zeolite from coal fly ash; Fe-MOR-ACH: Fe-containing mordenite from acidic co-hydrolysis route.

Figure 6A showed adsorption selectivity of CO2/N2 (15/85, v/v) calculated by single-component CO2 and N2 sorption isotherms at 273 and 298 K for Fe-MOR-CFA and Fe-MOR-ACH zeolites, giving excellent separation ability. Isosteric heats of CO2 adsorption (Qst) as a function of CO2 uptakes were analyzed [Figure 6B], giving similar values for these two zeolites. In addition, they have similar CO2 adsorption kinetics [Supplementary Figures 12 and 13], meaning similar electrostatic interaction between the iron species and CO2[33,51]. After recycling ten times, no loss for CO2 uptake at 298 K was observed for the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite [Figure 6C], indicating its recyclability for adsorption and desorption of CO2. Furthermore, the separation efficiency of the two zeolites was evaluated by the column breakthrough separations for the mixture of CO2/N2 (15/85, v/v) at 298 K and atmospheric pressure. As shown in Figure 6D, N2 breakthrough occurred immediately, while the CO2 retaining time of Fe-MOR-CFA and Fe-MOR-ACH zeolites were 100.4 and 97.0 min/g, respectively, and their CO2 adsorption capacities were 2.07 and 2.02 mmol/g, respectively. From the breakthrough curve, the separation coefficient for Fe-MOR-CFA and Fe-MOR-ACH zeolites were calculated at 58.9 and 53.5 for CO2/N2 (15/85, v/v), respectively, where the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite exhibited the separation coefficient even better than Fe-MOR-ACH zeolite, one of the best zeolite adsorbents of CO2 yet. The better performance might be associated with K+ and Ca2+ in the raw materials (CFA)[52]. In addition, the column breakthrough separations of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite with a relative humidity (RH) of 60% and the presence of SO2 (1,000 ppm) were performed at 298 K [Supplementary Figure 14]. The results showed the CO2 retaining time at 99.8 and 97.0 min/g, the CO2 adsorption capacity at 2.08 and 2.02 mmol/g, and the separation coefficient at 58.0 and 56.7, respectively. These results indicate that the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite has excellent tolerance to water and SO2. Moreover, the recyclability tests under the mixture of CO2/N2 (15/85, v/v) at 298 K also demonstrate the excellent long-term stability and performance over extended cycles of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite [Supplementary Figure 15 and Supplementary Table 3]. Subsequently, the column breakthrough separation for the mixture of CO2/N2 (50/50, v/v) over the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite was conducted at 298 K [Supplementary Figure 16], confirming that the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite had excellent CO2 adsorption performance with the CO2 retaining time of 34.6 min/g, the CO2 adsorption capacity of 2.40 mmol/g, and the separation coefficient of 44.0.

Sustainable synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite for efficient capture of CO<sub>2</sub>

Figure 6. (A) IAST prediction of CO2/N2 (15/85, v/v) selectivities on Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite and Fe-MOR-ACH zeolite at 273 and 298 K; (B) Isosteric heats (Qst) as a function of CO2 uptakes on Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite and Fe-MOR-ACH zeolite; (C) CO2 adsorption isotherms of Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite for ten times at 298 K; (D) Experimental column breakthrough curves for CO2/N2 (15/85, v/v) separations on Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite and Fe-MOR-ACH zeolite at 298 K. IAST: Ideal adsorbed solution theory; Fe-MOR-CFA: Fe-containing mordenite zeolite from coal fly ash; Fe-MOR-ACH: Fe-containing mordenite from acidic co-hydrolysis route.

Finally, the solvent-free synthesis of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite was scaled up to 100-200 mL autoclaves [Supplementary Figure 17]. The obtained zeolites showed high crystallinity and rod-shaped morphology [Supplementary Figures 18 and 19]. Moreover, the column breakthrough separations of the products for the mixture of CO2/N2 (15/85, v/v) showed that these products still owned excellent CO2 adsorption performance, giving the CO2 retaining time at 102.9-104.3 min/g and the CO2 adsorption capacity at 2.07-2.10 mmol/g [Supplementary Figure 20]. Particularly, the cost of these products in this work is lower by at least 50% than that of conventional products.

CONCLUSIONS

In summary, it is successful for solvent-free synthesis of Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite with high yields using solid waste of CFA as aluminum, silicon, and iron sources. This route not only consumes solid waste of CFA but also produces value-added CO2 adsorbents with high adsorption capacity, excellent separation coefficient, and good recyclability. The sustainable synthesis plus excellent features for capturing CO2 could provide a good opportunity for potential applications of the Fe-MOR-CFA zeolite in the future.

DECLARATIONS

Acknowledgments

We sincerely thank all the team members who participated in this study.

Authors’ contributions

Zeolite preparation, characterization, and the draft manuscript: Liu P

Discussion on the results: Yan K, Wang L

Design of the study, data analysis, and manuscript writing: Wu Q, Xiao FS

Availability of data and materials

Not applicable.

Financial support and sponsorship

This work was supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of China (2022YFA1503602), Shanxi-Zheda Institute of Advanced Materials and Chemical Engineering (2021SZ-AT003), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (22288101 and 22172141).

Conflicts of interest

Wang L is the Junior Editorial Board Member of Chemical Synthesis. Both Wang L and Xiao FS are the guest editors of the Special Issue of “Zeolite for Sustainable Catalysis”, while the other authors have declared that they have no conflicts of interest.

Ethical approval and consent to participate

Not applicable.

Consent for publication

Not applicable.

Copyright

© The Author(s) 2024.

Supplementary Materials

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OAE Style

Liu P, Wu Q, Yan K, Wang L, Xiao FS. Sustainable synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite for efficient capture of CO2. Chem Synth 2024;4:31. http://dx.doi.org/10.20517/cs.2023.70

AMA Style

Liu P, Wu Q, Yan K, Wang L, Xiao FS. Sustainable synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite for efficient capture of CO2. Chemical Synthesis. 2024; 4(3): 31. http://dx.doi.org/10.20517/cs.2023.70

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pei Liu, Qinming Wu, Keping Yan, Liang Wang, Feng-Shou Xiao. 2024. "Sustainable synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite for efficient capture of CO2" Chemical Synthesis. 4, no.3: 31. http://dx.doi.org/10.20517/cs.2023.70

ACS Style

Liu, P.; Wu Q.; Yan K.; Wang L.; Xiao F.S. Sustainable synthesis of Fe-MOR zeolite for efficient capture of CO2. Chem. Synth. 2024, 4, 31. http://dx.doi.org/10.20517/cs.2023.70

About This Article

Special Issue

This article belongs to the Special Issue Zeolites for Sustainable Catalysis
© The Author(s) 2024. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, for any purpose, even commercially, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Author Biographies

Pei Liu
Pei Liu obtained her BS degree in Chemical Engineering and Technology from Tiangong University in 2021. She is currently studying at College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University under the supervision of Prof. Feng-Shou Xiao and Dr. Qinming Wu. She mainly focuses on zeolite synthesis.
Dr. Qinming Wu
Dr. Qinming Wu obtained his BS degree in Chemistry from Zhejiang Sci-Tech University in 2011 and his PhD degree in Chemistry from Zhejiang University under the supervision of Prof. Feng-Shou Xiao in 2016. After postdoctoral work at Zhejiang University in China and University of Toyama in Japan, he joined Prof. Xiao’s group as an associated researcher professor at College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University in 2020. His research interests focus on the design and synthesis of zeolites for catalysis.
Prof. Keping Yan
Prof. Keping Yan received the BS and MS degrees in applied physics from Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, China, in 1983 and 1986, respectively, and the PhD degree, which focused on corona plasma generation, from Eindhoven University of technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, in 2001. In 2006, he joined Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, as a Full professor. He is the coauthor of approximately 200 papers in journals and the holder of ten patents. Since 1988, his research interests have included applied plasma technology, corona applications, and pulsed-power sources.
Dr. Liang Wang
Dr. Liang Wang obtained his BS degree in Chemistry from Jinlin University in 2008 and his PhD degree in Chemistry from Zhejiang University under the supervision of Prof. Feng-Shou Xiao in 2013. After postdoctoral work at Zhejiang University in China, he joined Prof. Xiao’s group as an associated researcher professor in 2015. In 2018, he became a “Hundred Talents Program” research fellow at College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University. His research interests include the applications of nano and porous catalytic materials in carbon resource conversion and fine chemical synthesis.
Prof. Feng-Shou Xiao
Prof. Feng-Shou Xiao received his BS and MS degrees from the Department of Chemistry, Jilin University. Then, he studied his PhD course at Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Jilin University, and Hokkaido University, and received his PhD degree from Jilin University in 1990. After postdoctoral work at University of California at Davis, he joined the faculty at Jilin University in 1994, where he became a full professor in 1996 and distinguished professor in 2003. In 2009, he moved to the Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University. In 2021, he went to College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University. His research is mainly focused on zeolites, porous materials, and catalysis.  

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